Sea level rise will swallow Miami, New Orleans, study finds

thecoastline

Say goodbye to Miami and New Orleans. No matter what we do to curb global warming, these and other beloved US cities will sink below rising seas, according to a study Monday.

But making extreme carbon cuts and moving to renewable energy could save millions of people living in iconic coastal areas of the United States, said the findings in the October 12 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a peer-reviewed US journal.

Scientists have already established that if we do nothing to reduce our burning of fossil fuel up to the year 2100, the planet will face sea level rise of 14-32 feet (4.3–9.9 meters), said lead author Ben Strauss, vice president for sea level and climate impacts at Climate Central.

The big uncertainty is the issue of when.

“Some of this could happen as early as next century,” Strauss told AFP.

“But it might also take many centuries,” he added.

“Just think of a pile of ice in a warm room. You know it is going to melt, but it is harder to say how quickly.”

To bring this issue home for people in the United States, the study pinpoints at-risk land where more than 20 million people reside.

The authors projected business-as-usual carbon emissions, in addition to the complication of the melting West Antarctic ice sheet, a process some experts fear is irreversible.

They also considered what might happen if the world were to make a big turnaround, reaching peak carbon emissions by 2020.

This radical scenario would have to occur far earlier than the current aim of some world powers to peak by 2050, said Strauss.

An online tool at allows users to see the impacts on various US cities. A global version is expected in the next month, Strauss said.

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Eric Write head editor and chief at The Pluto Daily
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