‘Prince’ Naseem Hamed attempts reconciliation with estranged former trainer, the legendary Brendan Ingle

Recently inducted in to the International Boxing Hall of Fame, ’Prince’ Naseem Hamed former WBO, WBC, IBF, Lineal featherweight champion, and European bantamweight champion, is rated of the best pound-for-pound  British boxers of all time.

Hamed from Sheffield, England (36-1-0-KO31) started boxing professionally at Flyweight in 1992. He soon began rising through the ranks as he knocked out a series of opponents in the opening rounds, often correctly predicting which round the knockout would happen.

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Hamed was known for his boxing antics and spectacular front somersault over the top rope into ring entrances, including entering the ring via a Chevrolet Impala, a flying carpet, a lift, and a palanquin. He also re-enacted the video of Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

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Brendan Ingle trained the world champion for 16 years along with three other world champions, six European, 15 British and six Commonwealth champions; he is one of most successful trainers to ever grace the sport.

Their professional and personal relationship broke down in 1997 following Ingle’s controversial comments in a book titled “The Paddy and the Prince, The Making of Naseem Hamed”. In the book Ingle criticised the WBO featherweight champion, saying money had become his god.

At the time Hamed now 41 years old retaliated but is now keen to apologise for ‘nasty things’ he said about his mentor.

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Hamed recently told the Daily Telegraph: “I want to see Brendan and say sorry for the nasty things I said about him, because I am so grateful for the things he did for me.

“The person that I want to be honoured with me in Canastota is the first trainer I ever had and that’s Brendan. He should be in the Hall of Fame. He’s produced so many world champions. The time I had with Brendan was an amazing time. It was priceless.

“You couldn’t put an amount of money on that.

“What I learnt from that gym and that environment was priceless. The only thing I really want is to sit with Brendan to apologise to him, if I upset him, and to make up with Brendan.

“I’ve been asking to go and see him for two or three years and his son keeps saying to me he’s not ready. I want to go back.

“I spent more time with that man than his own gym. You can just see how many world champions and great fighters were created from that stable.

“It wouldn’t be a nice thing if I walked to the actual house and was rejected. I went to a boxing show not long ago and he was there. He looked at me like he could see straight through me.

“I will go there, put my cards on the table and say: ‘Listen, I’m a father of three now, them boxing days have gone by the wayside, I’m just here to say to you, I’d love to make up with you. I want to give you a big hug and apologise for everything I said wrong to you or did. I want you to forgive me.’”

Hamed never officially retired and last fought in 2002, following his only career defeat to Marco Antonio Barrera by outpointing Manuel Calvo. In a post-fight interview with Ian Darke, Hamed assured a quick return to the ring, which ultimately never happened.

 

In an interview for Sky Sports, Hamed mentioned that part of the reason that he left boxing after this fight, aged just 28, was because of his commitments to his family, whom he would often not see for up to 12 weeks at a time whilst attending training camps. Hamed also gave an interview for BBC Radio Sportsweek and announced that his retirement was largely due to chronic hand problems, hand fractures and hand surgery.

‘Prince’ Naseem Hamed attempts reconciliation with estranged former trainer, the legendary Brendan Ingle

Recently inducted in to the International Boxing Hall of Fame, ’Prince’ Naseem Hamed former WBO, WBC, IBF, Lineal featherweight champion, and European bantamweight champion, is rated of the best pound-for-pound  British boxers of all time.

Hamed from Sheffield, England (36-1-0-KO31) started boxing professionally at Flyweight in 1992. He soon began rising through the ranks as he knocked out a series of opponents in the opening rounds, often correctly predicting which round the knockout would happen.

box_a_hamed11_576x324

Hamed was known for his boxing antics and spectacular front somersault over the top rope into ring entrances, including entering the ring via a Chevrolet Impala, a flying carpet, a lift, and a palanquin. He also re-enacted the video of Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

naseem-carpet1

Brendan Ingle trained the world champion for 16 years along with three other world champions, six European, 15 British and six Commonwealth champions; he is one of most successful trainers to ever grace the sport.

Their professional and personal relationship broke down in 1997 following Ingle’s controversial comments in a book titled “The Paddy and the Prince, The Making of Naseem Hamed”. In the book Ingle criticised the WBO featherweight champion, saying money had become his god.

At the time Hamed now 41 years old retaliated but is now keen to apologise for ‘nasty things’ he said about his mentor.

imagesOZ6ZHL0H

Hamed recently told the Daily Telegraph: “I want to see Brendan and say sorry for the nasty things I said about him, because I am so grateful for the things he did for me.

“The person that I want to be honoured with me in Canastota is the first trainer I ever had and that’s Brendan. He should be in the Hall of Fame. He’s produced so many world champions. The time I had with Brendan was an amazing time. It was priceless.

“You couldn’t put an amount of money on that.

“What I learnt from that gym and that environment was priceless. The only thing I really want is to sit with Brendan to apologise to him, if I upset him, and to make up with Brendan.

“I’ve been asking to go and see him for two or three years and his son keeps saying to me he’s not ready. I want to go back.

“I spent more time with that man than his own gym. You can just see how many world champions and great fighters were created from that stable.

“It wouldn’t be a nice thing if I walked to the actual house and was rejected. I went to a boxing show not long ago and he was there. He looked at me like he could see straight through me.

“I will go there, put my cards on the table and say: ‘Listen, I’m a father of three now, them boxing days have gone by the wayside, I’m just here to say to you, I’d love to make up with you. I want to give you a big hug and apologise for everything I said wrong to you or did. I want you to forgive me.’”

Hamed never officially retired and last fought in 2002, following his only career defeat to Marco Antonio Barrera by outpointing Manuel Calvo. In a post-fight interview with Ian Darke, Hamed assured a quick return to the ring, which ultimately never happened.

 

In an interview for Sky Sports, Hamed mentioned that part of the reason that he left boxing after this fight, aged just 28, was because of his commitments to his family, whom he would often not see for up to 12 weeks at a time whilst attending training camps. Hamed also gave an interview for BBC Radio Sportsweek and announced that his retirement was largely due to chronic hand problems, hand fractures and hand surgery.