First person diagnosed with Ebola in U.S. dies

ABC News has confirmed that the man who is the first patient to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died.

Thomas Eric Duncan has spend weeks at a Dallas hospital. He came to Dallas in late September but did not at the time he entered the U.S. display any physical signs of having the disease.

Ebola has killed more than 3,400 people in West Africa and infected at least twice that many, according to the World Health Organization. The virus has taken an especially devastating toll on health care workers, sickening or killing more than 370 of them in the hardest-hit countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone — places that already were short on doctors and nurses before Ebola.

President Barack Obama has said the U.S. will be “working on protocols to do additional passenger screening both at the source and here in the United States.” Extra screening measures are in effect at certain airports in the affected countries. In Liberia, passengers leaving the country are screened for fever and asked if they have had contact with anyone infected with the disease.

Dr. Tom Frieden of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said this week that officials are looking at all options “to see what we can do to increase safety of all Americans.”

 

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Dan Mullin is an active writer and editor for the Pluto Daily who covered the 2014 Ebola Outbreak. Mullin attended the Wake Forest School of Medicine before leaving to pursue his lifelong science goal of allowing humans to live forever via a computer/brain transfer.