Dr. Spencer Entering Worst Part of Ebola Fight, Viewed as ‘Arrogant’

Dr. Craig Spencer recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Africa with Doctors Without Borders and was diagnosed in New York on Thursday. He received a plasma transfusion from Nancy Writebol, an aid worker who contracted the deadly disease in Africa and survived.

The doctor is being treated for Ebola in Manhattan after becoming New York’s first resident to be diagnosed with the deadly virus. The staff treating him hasn’t released an official statement. The rumors are flying out of Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan despite no statement.

The doctor has been labeled as arrogant by much of the hospital staff as he has been telling nurses what to do, and informing doctors that they might be treating him wrong.

This is the person who is known in New York for riding on the NYC subway with a fever, and not the guy mighty hero that sailed to Africa to fight the Ebola that his mind leads him to believe. This doctor who just returned from seeing the virus first hand, came back and went bowling while prancing around the city on public transit.

Spencer is looked at as somebody who thought he was bigger than Ebola, and here he is in the hospital with the same mind state despite having the virus. The hospital staff views him as a potential threat, and taking orders from a 33 year old ‘hot shot’ doctor might be ok when they are treating a for strep or a broken bone but with Ebola it isn’t.

Early reports out of the hospital mentioned that there was hospital workers calling in sick and avoiding Spencer at all costs. It seems that some of those rumors were true, but not exactly in the same part of the section that is treating this Ebola Bowler.

The crew has shown up to treat the doctor despite these reports which is a good thing and should show that virus isn’t that contagious if these workers can stay healthy.

Currently, Dr. Spencer is in serious but stable condition and looks better, a hospital official said Sunday.

Spencer’s fiance is under quarantine with no symptoms showing.

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